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Success Stories

The following are actual cases of individuals filing a claim for accelerated benefits under the Chronic, Critical, and Terminal Illness Riders on their life insurance policies. The product, amounts in force, amount requested and disposition are all factual, but the names and scenarios have been changed to protect the recipients.

Policy Amount $100,000
Critical Illness: Lung Cancer
Amount Accelerated: $50,000
Remaining Death Benefit: $50,000

Albert became sick and visited his doctor. After his initial blood tests, his doctor referred him to a lung cancer specialist who, after many tests, found that Albert had Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer that had spread to other parts of his body. Albert began aggressive Chemo Therapy and began missing work due to the extreme fatigue and sickness. As a result, money was infrequent and medical bills piled up. In addition to the home and medical bills, the truck payment and insurance were due each month.

His wife contacted the advisor who had sold them the term life insurance policy. Their advisor suggested that with Albert’s current condition, they should consider submitting a claim for an acceleration of the life insurance death benefit under the Accelerated Benefit Rider for Critical Illness on their Term policy. He discussed their needs and they submitted a claim for an acceleration of 50% on their $100,000 policy.

Albert and his wife now had the resources to provide Albert with the best medical care possible. Without Living Benefits, they may have had to have liquidated important assets to have the money available to financially survive.

Policy Amount $325,384
Critical Illness: Heart Attack
Amount Accelerated: $69,840.37
Remaining Death Benefit: $255,903

In 2014, Jim suffered a heart attack and over the course of the next three months suffered seven additional heart attacks. Jim was diagnosed with Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease in which three of the epicardial coronary arteries were involved with atherosclerosis of significant severity.

Jim was unable to work currently and Millie was afraid to leave him for fear he could have another heart attack and die. Millie remembered that their advisor had told them their policy had living benefits called Accelerated Benefit Riders for Critical, Chronic and Terminal illness. They made a claim under their policy.

As bills stacked up, Millie’s paychecks became smaller, and Jim’s paycheck ceased, as his employer was small and did not have any disability insurance. At the time of claim, the doctor found that although Jim was sick he had a 20 year life expectancy if he controlled his condition with medication. The offer, which was in part based upon his life expectancy, came out to $69,840.37

Jim and Millie had a cushion to recover financially while Jim focused on getting healthier. A traditional life insurance policy would have been another bill to pay while experiencing this difficult time financially.

Policy Amount $250,000
Critical Illness: Breast Cancer
Amount Accelerated: $137,500
Remaining Death Benefit: $112,500

Jessica was diagnosed by her physician with breast cancer at age 48. She has a husband and two children. Prior to getting sick, they were both employed outside the home and both were very important to the house finances. After diagnosis, Jessica chooses to exercise her critical illness rider and receive a portion of her death benefit early. She plans to use the money to help the family cover her medical expenses as she recovers and make up for her husband’s lost income due to missed days at work while he cares for her.

Jessica and her husband decided to submit a claim on her policy. The offer, which was in part based upon severity of illness and life expectancy, came out to $112,500. Jessica had an additional $112,500 left on her policy and her new policy payment was adjusted to reflect the remaining benefit.

In the case of another diagnosis in the future, Jessica has the ability to accelerate additional death benefit for any purpose needed.

These are just a few of the many situations where Living Benefits was the difference between surviving and potential financial disaster. In many cases both spouses suffer lost income when the other becomes critically ill.

Policy Amount $250,000
Critical Illness: Breast Cancer
Amount Accelerated: $110,624
Remaining Death Benefit: $139,736

Randi is diagnosed by her physician with breast cancer at age 62. She has a husband and two children. Prior to getting sick, she worked as a school teacher. Her husband owns a painting business. Randi chooses to exercise her critical illness rider and receive a portion of her death benefit early. She plans to use the money to help the family cover her medical expenses and make up for her husband’s lost income while he cares for her.

Without dipping into retirement savings, Randi now has the resources to survive this illness and seek the best medical care possible.

Policy Amount $200,000
Critical Illness: COPD Complications
Amount Accelerated: $157,372
Remaining Death Benefit: $42,268

After 6 years, Joe is 66 years old and is suffering from complications related to COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) that have left him unable to perform 2 ADLs. His wife works full-time and is not able to provide the daily care assistance that he requires. Joe decides to exercise his chronic illness rider to help pay for his care assistance.

Two years later, Joe’s condition has not improved and he decides to exercise his rider a second time to help pay for his extensive medical costs.

Joe passes away one year later. His beneficiaries will receive his remaining death benefit which will help them pay for his final expenses.

Without Living Benefits, Joe and his wife would have had a hard time coming up with the money to pay for his extensive medical costs.

Policy Amount $150,000
Critical Illness: Terminal Illness
Amount Accelerated: $136,164
Remaining Death Benefit: $13,836

Howard is 65 years old and terminally ill. His doctor recently informed him that he has less than 12 months to live. Howard decides to exercise his terminal illness rider and plans to use the money to take his children and grandchildren on a family vacation while he is still able to do so. He passes away 9 months later.

Without this living benefit, Howard may not have had the money to take his family on this special trip and enjoy his remaining time with his loved ones.

These are just a few of the many situations where Living Benefits was the difference between surviving and potential financial disaster. In many cases both spouses suffer lost income when the other becomes critically ill.

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